Amicable Lodge, A.F. & A.M. Rotating Header Image

2013-2014 Installation of Officers

Amicable Lodge request the honor of your presence for the ceremonies of the
2013-2014 Installation of Officers

am_1

am_2

Saturday, September 28, 2013
1950 Massachusetts Ave. ▪ Porter Sq. ▪ Cambridge, MA

Private Opening: 4:30Pm (Members of Amicable Lodge Only)
Public Installation: 5:00Pm
Collation & Dinner: 6:30Pm 

Parking Behind Henderson Carriage Building
2067 Mass. Ave., 2 Blocks North, Rear Section
Dinner Reservations Required! RSVP With Wor. Andrew Grove
argrove@rcn.com or 617-733-4663

2012-2013 Installation of Officers

Amicable Lodge request the honor of your presence for the ceremonies of the
2012-2013 Installation of Officers

2012-2013 Installation of Officers

Saturday, September 22, 2012
1950 Massachusetts Ave. ▪ Porter Sq. ▪ Cambridge, MA

Private Opening: 4:30Pm (Members of Amicable Lodge Only)
Public Installation: 5:00Pm
Collation & Dinner: 6:30Pm – $20.00

Parking Behind Henderson Carriage Building
2067 Mass. Ave., 2 Blocks North, Rear Section
Dinner Reservations Required! RSVP With Wor. Andrew Grove
argrove@rcn.com or 617-733-4663

Amicable Lodge Reaches out to Kenya

Bro. Michael Koeller of Amicable Lodge (back row, left of sign) sent this image to us from Kenya to thank the Lodge for its charitable contributions to the village he was visiting on a humanitarian mission.

Thank You Amicable Lodge

Visit to Overlook at Charlton

The Brothers at Amicable went to visit the Overlook Masonic Homes this weekend, and had cake and punch with the nursing home residents. A great time was had by all.

From left to right; David Riley, Michael Koeller, Nicholas Batzell, Andrew Grove, Eric Spector, Brian and Kevin from King Solomon’s Lodge, Christopher Duggan and Loretta, Jeremy Gross and Jeremy Sher.

Explore Amicable Lodge

Explore Amicable Lodge with this slideshow created by one of its members!

Thinking Outside the Squares (of Cambridge)

Amicable Lodge was recently featured in a video segment on The Boston Channel.

Thinking Outside the Squares (of Cambridge)

View Video: Thinking Outside the Squares (of Cambridge)

The video starts 1:30 min into the segment.

Meet The Masons

The following is a news story from The Boston Phoenix written by Eugenia Williamson Published on February 17, 2011.

How the Boston rock scene grew up, got real jobs, and became — Freemasons?

The all-seeing eye of rock and roll

The Masons of Amicable Lodge have tattoos curling out from under their button-down shirts. They wear giant rings and waist aprons that look like oversize satin envelopes. They wear ties and medals and amulets. They carry staffs. Each month, they gather to practice secret rituals in Porter Square.

Once, they played in Boston bands like Slapshot, Crash and Burn, Sam Black Church, Victory at Sea, the Men, and Cradle to the Grave. Back then, none of them would have dreamed of joining the Masons. Masonry — a fraternal society that dates back to the 1700s — has not, heretofore, been associated with rock and roll.

But people get older and settle down. They get married. They have kids. They get jobs. They join the Masons.

An Assembly of Amicable Lodge's Members.

In a strange way, this seems like a logical next step for veterans of the Boston rock scene. “A lot of people become involved in music because they’re looking for something higher — or to get girls, which is something higher,” says Ian Adams, Mason, film grip, occasional Phoenix illustrator, and member emeritus of 8 Ball Shifter and Rock City Crimewave. “It’s looking for that thing that’s bigger than you — the first time you hear the Ramones on the radio, it’s that spiritual thing.”

Masonry fills that need, Adams says. “The idea that you’re doing something that other people have done in the past [allows] you to step out of time,” he explains. “We’re born, get old, and die, but the rituals remain the same. It’s a time machine. It’s a connection to eternity.”


TILED BEAVERS AND MASONIC COASTERS

Along with other fraternal organizations — the Knights of Columbus, the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, the Elks, the Lions, the Rotarians, Kiwanis — the Masons had their heyday in the scotch-soaked early 1960s, when men brought home the bacon and women stayed home with the kids. Fred Flintstone, a man of his time, belonged to the Loyal Order of the Water Buffaloes. After a hard day at the Slate Rock and Gravel Company, Flintstone would slide down the bronto crane, don a silly hat, and drink beer with his brethren before returning home to Wilma and Pebbles.

Freemasonry, the first and largest of these secret societies, began with medieval stonemasons’ guilds who adopted esoteric rites, rituals, and degrees of initiation, collectively known as the Craft. Today, Masons are avowedly non-denominational, though membership requires belief in a Supreme Being.

Masonry came to America with the colonists. Boston is home to the nation’s oldest Masonic Grand Lodge. It sits right on the Common — that building with the tiled beavers on the side. Inside are grand, lushly appointed meeting halls. In rooms smelling vaguely of stale cigar smoke, lockers made of glass and carved wood hold funny hats and cloaks. A tiled-floored, dimly-lit chamber is populated by marble figurines in cubby holes. The Masonic conference room is wallpapered in a gold square-and-compass pattern; the conference table is dotted with Masonic coasters.

“I think a lot of people’s misconception of the fraternity is that it’s a bunch of stodgy old men,” says Master Mason J.R. Roach. Roach, 41, is a big dude with black hair and a couple of tattoos that he keeps covered up. Once he was the drummer for Boston stalwarts Sam Black Church and played with KISS, Ted Nugent, Motörhead, Black Sabbath, and Dio. More >>

Listen to the Podcast.

Eugenia Williamson can be reached at ewilliamson@phx.com.

A Place of Their Own

The following is a news story from The Boston Herald written by Margery Eagan. It highlights Amicable’s own Bro. Major Carroll.

A Place of their own

Homeless mom grateful for help in her struggle

If you would like to help, you can drop off new toys — unwrapped — particularly for older children at The Salvation Army, 402 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge. You can also send unwrapped toys or tax deductible contributions to The Salvation Army, Box 390647, Cambridge, 02139.

It’s as simple as this: Magaly’s 18-month-old son Sean — and the 37 other kids at Our Place, the Salvation Army’s day-care center in Cambridge — need toys. So do the hundreds of other older children who depend on the big-hearted Army.

Heading out into the frigid cold yesterday, Magaly, a single mother of four, bundled up Sean in the center’s hallway and explained that life has been hard of late.

Her belongings have been in storage since she fled her Somerville apartment and a violent home life. That’s why she didn’t want her last name used.

Now she and her children, unable to turn to family, live in a homeless shelter. It can be scary and rigid — far from all that’s familiar.

Sean, holding tight yesterday to his animal crackers, struggles with chronic asthma. Her older children struggle with worries over school and moving again. And Magaly just struggles, particularly now, at Christmas, with no money for gifts and no home to hang even a single string of lights.

Yet with all of this she kept thanking God and Salvation Army Major Stephen Carroll yesterday for the chance to get her life back together. “I prayed to God for a spot in the day-care center,” she said of Our Place, which has a waiting list of 20 kids.

“I told God, if it’s meant to be, open the doors to us. And He opened the doors,” she said, smiling at Carroll. “God bless you. God bless you.

It’s a scene very different from what most of us experience this time of year with our big trees, our porches decked with lights — our biggest headache deciding how much we’re charging on VISA for every new gadget our kids demand.

But here was Magaly yesterday, facing a long, cold walk to a homeless shelter, grateful for her son’s day care, thankful for the party she’ll attend today courtesy of the Cambridge Rotary and the Sheraton Commander. There’ll be lunch on tablecloths with silver and china, Christmas lights, Santa and carols.

“There’s something very special,” said Carroll, “about going to a fancy hotel, mums and kids all dressed up. These are folks who have very little . . .”

Carroll said many more people than usual have very little this year. Daily from 6 to 9:15 a.m. at North Station, he rings his bell and gives commuters “angel trees” — paper angels with names of needy children and gift requests.

Carroll says the Army is in dire need of Christmas presents for children ages 10 to 13: backpacks, movie tickets, board games, body and bath lotions for girls.

Max, age 10, says he’ll take “anything.”

Carroll started to choke up. “I’m sorry. I get emotional.” Then he said, “There is just so much need.”

If you would like to help, you can drop off new toys — unwrapped — particularly for older children at The Salvation Army, 402 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge. You can also send unwrapped toys or tax deductible contributions to The Salvation Army, Box 390647, Cambridge, 02139.

Ceremony at King Solomon Masonic Lodge in Somerville

The following is a news story from The Somerville News:

Ceremony at King Solomon Masonic Lodge in Somerville

(L to R) R.W. Jerry A Roach Jr and Lodge’s Master, Wor. Jose M. Jorge. - Photo by William Tauro

By Donald Norton

At a ceremony at King Solomon’s Masonic Lodge in Somerville Thursday evening, the District Deputy Grand Master R.W. Jerry A Roach Jr was presented a citation and a clock as gifts from Lodge’s Master, Wor. Jose M. Jorge. Thursday’s meeting was RW Jerry Roach’s last official visit before retiring, he is a member of  Amicable Lodge in Cambridge. A large turnout of members in Somerville turned out to wish Jerry Roach the best for his successful term of office these past 2 years.

Virgin Weeping Painting

Virgin Weeping Painting

Virgin Weeping Painting

The virgin weeping painting (finished in 2010) replaces the old painting (circa 1870-1880). The old painting, now hanging in the Prelates Room, is so badly darkened that members and candidates could not clearly see the allagory depicted.

Brother N. Reed  painted this new version. The five pointed star comes from an old print of this scene and represents Maia, one of seven sisters, mother of Hermes and one of the patron gods of early Freemasons. Maia is said to represent Geometry. The old painting was so dark that this star which is in the background was never seen. Today, many similar paintings, statues, and prints showing the “virgin weeping” or  “father time” allagory, exclude  this star. Believed to have been first created by Brother Jeremy Cross, the scene depicts  the scythe, an emblem of time; the broken column,  a early emblem of death and life unfinished; the urn; the sprig , which in some early versions was a lily; the book; and father time, a emblem of death, life, and  immortality. Some prints show the hourglass others do not. The virgin is said to represent the goddess Rhea, weeping at the pool. An early print of this virgin weeping shows the virgin with arms pointing to the constellations, a broken column and father time.

Our version will be enjoyed by many generations of Masons to come.

Membership Type